55 and older communitiesFlorida

There are numerous options for Florida senior care currently available, ranging from home care and independent living to full nursing homes. Choosing the type of senior care that’s right for your loved one is a challenging task, and much research needs to be undertaken to find the type of care that would best suit their needs. When looking for the right type of care, keep the wishes of your loved ones at the forefront, but also keep in mind their health needs, personal preferences, as well as likes and dislikes. Knowing the difference between different types of senior care will help you make the right decision.

Florida Nursing Homes

Nursing Homes are otherwise known as Long-Term Care or Skilled Nursing Facilities or Homes for the Aged. Nursing homes are for elderly individuals who require assistance and care 24/7. Seniors with debilitating medical problems or cognitive impairments, who require professional assistance, opt for this type of care option. The distinguishing feature of nursing homes is that they provide professional medical assistance, convenience of access to physical therapists, many kinds of healthcare practitioners, as well as nutritional meals and personal care amenities.

Assisted Living Facilities

Assisted living combines independent living with assistance from professionals when necessary. Support services are available when needed.

In these types of communities, seniors receive help with certain daily activities, such personal care, medication reminders, or other activities, all dependent on individual needs.

Here, seniors’ living space usually has his/her own furnishings and decorations; staff are required to be accommodating to the privacy and independence of each resident.

Thus, the main difference between nursing homes and assisted living communities is that the former offer professional and on-going medical services, while in the latter, assistance is offered largely with regular daily activities.

Which is more appropriate at each stage in the life of a senior?

Assisted living residences and communities can look like single-family dwellings or apartment buildings including common visiting and dining areas. The atmosphere of the suites and studios in an assisted living community are usually home-like including kitchenettes offering the resident the choice to dine alone or in a community dining room.

Seniors that have experienced a decline in health and require assistance with one or more daily life activities may be perfectly suited to an assisted living environment. Many Assisted Living arrangements and communities allow the individual to age in place rather than relocate to a facility that provides additional levels of care and the way to find out whether the residence of your loved one qualifies for the option to age in place is to contact the division of government, usually the Ministry of Health, in your province.

Nursing Homes employ health care professionals that are available to their residents as needed and they also offer most of the same options that an assisted living community offers. For example, social get togethers and excursions, physical therapy and exercise classes. The bottom line is to assess the needs of your loved one and match them to the type of care and the options provided at each level.

Assisted Living Considerations

memory care assisted living

Common Myths about Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs)

When faced with the responsibility of choosing and selecting senior care options, many families have preconceived ideas about what assisted living facilities represent for their loved one's future. Common myths are perpetuated by the media, which tends to emphasize the negative stories experienced by a relatively small number of seniors. The following information will dispel those myths and provide helpful insight about the benefits of ALFs.

Myth #1: The phrase 'assisted living facility' is just new terminology to describe nursing homes.

In fact, ALFs are a relatively new concept designed to serve the needs of a changing society, in which seniors live longer than ever before and prefer to live as independently as possible. Throughout the United States, adult children commonly juggle two-career households, raising children and attempting to meet the needs of their aging parents. Within the last twenty years, professionals in the field of eldercare have recognized the need to promote an active lifestyle within an environment where care is also provided. As a result, seniors no longer feel they are burdening their families with their needs, live independently in their own apartment, enjoy a full calendar of activities and feel secure in knowing assistance is always available. Whereas nursing homes focus primarily on skilled medical care and therapies, assisted living facilities promote as much independence in activities of daily living as possible.

Myth #3: Medicare will pay for the care provided in assisted living facilities.

Medicare does not provide coverage for non-skilled care services such as assistance with activities of daily living, including bathing, dressing, medication management, toileting and transferring. While skilled nursing facilities accept Medicare, ALFs typically accept only private pay or long-term care insurance. In some instances, assisted living facilities will license a limited number of apartments for Medicaid recipients and others may offer programs to assist residents whose income falls below a particular median range. However, those with limited finances and who anticipate applying for Medicaid in the near future may want to consider alternative care options such as care homes.


55 and older communitiesFlorida

55 and older communitiesFlorida